“Orange Light Theory of Functional Fitness”

When we perform post-offer pre-employment physical ability tests, we remind applicants of the strength demands as defined by their potential new employer as we get to the strength portion of the test. While the main reason for telling them is so that we are clear and transparent about the expectations of the testing process, it also helps to set up a discussion with each applicant about their physical status.

Every post-offer applicant gets a quick reminder that if they are currently working out in a gym or at home, they should continue to do that once they start their new job. More importantly, they should not treat their job as a workout. If they aren’t currently working out, we tell them to go a gym, find a work out app to use at home, check out the available workout videos on places like YouTube or Amazon Prime Video, but most importantly to start doing something. Many of these come with position specific reminders – for patient transporters to start walking more if they don’t walk regularly because the position can require several miles of walking per shift, for train conductors to hit the stairs once in a while because their new employer has been adding as many double decker train cars as they possibly can, etc. The typical response is “I used to work out all the time but {insert some life event} got in the way….I swear as soon as I get this job, I will start working out, running, etc.”

Fortunately or unfortunately, depending on how you want to look at from an employment standpoint or a health/fitness standpoint, we have been seeing a lot of people that are just that tiny bit stronger than the essential demands of their soon to be position require. This is good for them, because they pass this phase in the process of pursuing their new job. But, it is not a lot of cushion from a physical abilities standpoint. When we see areas that they can improve in strength in the data collected during the test, we try to share that with them, just as we try to share some better techniques with them if their positioning to lift from floor height could use some improvement.

But, a lot of people as soon as they are aware of the fact that they have demonstrated the required strength start to tune out those pieces of advice and the statement they made about working out after getting the job has already started to fade into distant echoes. Because of this, I have tried getting a little more creative in trying to get these new hire candidates to understand the importance of keeping in shape and maybe even increasing their strength a little bit more.

 

My new go to explanation for the need to increase strength is the “Orange Light Theory” – almost everyone that comes through our doors, whether they drive or not, knows what it means when that little orange light begins to glow on the dashboard. The tank isn’t empty yet, but a gas station better be in the near future or there will be a problem. For those candidates who just squeak by on the essential demands by a couple of pounds of lifting or carrying strength, I explain to them that they passed – they still have gas – but that the orange light is on. They need to get a little stronger so that they have a reserve of strength to help them on those days when they work overtime or when they have to pick up the slack because someone called out sick, or when the unexpected happens like pipes bursting and causing a lot of work to happen in a short time – or more importantly, having the energy at the end of the day to play with their kids.   Giving them this visual seems to help put their current strength in a context that they can understand better.

While testing applicants to determine whether or not they meet the essential physical and postural demands for a position is the reason for performing a post-offer pre-employment physical abilities test, it is a great opportunity to help give enough knowledge to applicants to give them a reason to take ownership of their physical fitness so that hopefully, they don’t return to us for a functional capacity evaluation due to an injury.

An orange light comes on to let drivers know that they are almost out of fuel.
That pesky orange light comes on and lets you know that you are almost empty. We need to have a high enough fitness level to limit our body’s orange light from needing to come on while performing work related tasks.

Human Factors at The Oscars

Steven Shorrock provides a great look into what went on with the mishandled envelope at the Oscars leading to the announcement of an incorrect winner by Warren Beatty.

Humanistic Systems

5121440257_e81647480b_o.jpg Photo: Craig Piersma CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/8NyHL6

“An extraordinary blunder”

It has variously been described as “an incredible and almost unbelievable gaffe” (Radio Times), the greatest mistake in Academy Awards history” (Telegraph), “an extraordinary blunder…an unprecedented error” (ITV News), “the most spectacular blunder in the history of the starry ceremony” and “the most awkward, embarrassing Oscar moment of all time: an extraordinary failure” (Guardian).

It was, of course, the Grand Finale of the Oscars 2017.

Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty are all set to announce the best picture win. Beatty begins to read out the winners card. But he looks visibly puzzled, pausing and looking in the envelope to see if there is anything else that he’s missed. He begins to read out the winners card, “And the Academy Award…”…

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The most important Super Bowl viewers

Over the last decade, the issue of concussions in professional football has been addressed in books, movies, lawsuits, and significant coverage in the news media.

While nobody is fully sure of the best way to completely address the issue and minimize the risk of concussions during play and practice, the NFL instituted an important program in 2012 to become more proactive in addressing potential concussion situations during games.  The NFL began placing certified athletic trainers (ATCs) in the stadiums to view games with the purpose of looking at both the in-game contact as well as player behavior after plays and along the sidelines.

The inclusion of these healthcare professionals was a result of a hit to Browns quarterback Colton McCoy during a late season game in  December 2011 after the institution of a video review system for injuries.  The hit that McCoy took was not noticed during the game but after the game.  The NFL realized that a set of eyes were needed to review potential issues in real time.  The ATC spotters observe both the game and video feed from the broadcast coverage in real time to identify plays that may result in concussion or injury whether it is from player to player contact or contact with the ground.  The ATCs then contact either the team medical staff or the unaffiliated neurotruama consultant to advise them of what was observed.  These calls can not be handled by bench staff from the team.  The ATCs also instruct technicians to send the video of the specific incident to the sidelines for medical staff to include in their evaluation of the athlete.  According to the NFL, approximately 10 plays per game initiate this process.  ATC spotters can also initiate a medical timeout.  These timeouts are not charged to either team.

While there are several criteria for ATCs who wish to apply to this program, I think the most interesting are:

  • At least 10 years experience – enough experience to really have an idea of what they are observing
  • Can not have been the Head Trainer for any NFL team previously
  • Can not have been employed by an NFL team in the last 20 years

I think the last two criteria that I mentioned are probably the best at showing a positive intent for this program by the NFL.  These two criteria help to minimize the impact that past relationships with teams and/or players may have on an ATC Spotters observations.

While this is a great program and the NFL appears to have done a great job in keeping the program impartial and they have empowered the ATCs with the authority to stop game play, this only addresses observational, subjective game day issues.  It still does not provide an objective and measured value to the cumulative impacts that occur during the game – or more importantly, the significant hours of practice and seasons of games that comprise a player’s career.

Helmet impact sensors like those from Shockbox may help to provide a more objective dataset to determine the amount of cumulative impacts that a player goes through during the course of games and practices.  The US military has been studying head trauma through the use of helmet sensors since 2007 and began collaborating with the NFL in 2012 to better advance the science and address the issues.

The US Army had been using helmet based sensors in Afghanistan to measure blast pressures during IED events during combat patrols.  The sensors are triggered with forces greater than 150 newtons, which is the equivalent of just under 34 pounds of force.  Not a whole lot of force when compared to the forces of between 447 pounds and 1,066 pounds in boxers when punching.  However, a drawback to the Army/DARPA program was that it was only run in combat zones and did not take into account proximity and cumulative exposure to blast pressures when firing heavy weapons. The program was ended in late 2016.

There is one five year study that was done at University of North Carolina that looked at not just game day impacts but also the hits sustained during practice sessions.  The data that they collected shows some interesting data points.  They found that some impacts that were of significant force did not cause concussions while some lesser impacts that were below “threshold” did cause concussions.  Within these below threshold concussions, they found that the area of the point of impact on the head is just as important as the amount of force.

We still have a lot to learn about the causes and effects of concussions as well as treatment post concussion (as we’ve pointed out in a Friday Five post).  But, we can take notes from the positive aspects of what the NFL has done so far with their ATC Spotter program in being more proactive in dealing with health related “workplace” issues.